The New York Review of Books. Vol XL, Issue #16. October 7, 1993 Periodical Blicero Books
The New York Review of Books. Vol XL, Issue #16. October 7, 1993 Periodical Blicero Books
The New York Review of Books. Vol XL, Issue #16. October 7, 1993 Periodical Blicero Books
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, The New York Review of Books. Vol XL, Issue #16. October 7, 1993 Periodical Blicero Books
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, The New York Review of Books. Vol XL, Issue #16. October 7, 1993 Periodical Blicero Books
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, The New York Review of Books. Vol XL, Issue #16. October 7, 1993 Periodical Blicero Books

The New York Review of Books. Vol XL, Issue #16. October 7, 1993

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Vol XL, Issue #16. October 7, 1993. 56 pp A great chance to complete your print collection. NYRB issues prior to January 2016 are not available on the NYRB website. 

  • Essay by Amos Elon, on Israels Holocaust politics: 'The Politics of Memory'
  • Robert Craft on 'Trial of Strength: Wilhelm Furtwängler and the Third Reich'
  • George Soros, 'Bosnia and Beyond'
  • Poem by Joseph Brodsky
  • Review of books on 'Diversity' and Its Dangers

The New York Review of Books is a semi-monthly magazine. With a worldwide circulation of over 135,000, the magazine has established itself as “the premier literary-intellectual magazine in the English language.” (Esquire) It is a magazine in which "the most interesting and qualified minds of our time discuss current books and issues in depth"

From the 1960s into the 21st Century, The New York Review of Books has posed the questions in the debate on American life, culture, and politics. It is the journal where Mary McCarthy reported on the Vietnam War from Saigon and Hanoi; Edmund Wilson challenged Vladimir Nabokov’s translations; Hannah Arendt published her reflections on violence; Ralph Nader published his “manifesto” for consumer justice; I.F. Stone investigated the lies of Watergate; Susan Sontag challenged the claims of modern photography.

The Chicago Tribune said the Review is “one of the few venues in American life that takes ideas seriously. And it pays readers the ultimate compliment of assuming that we do too.”